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A.06.G REPORTS

Documents

Created Date Thursday, 23 November 2017
Modified Date Thursday, 23 November 2017
Filesize 781 Kilobytes

Keep Investing in Alberta’s Children: The Government’s Role in Ending Child and Family Poverty

Prepared in partnership with the Edmonton Social Planning Council, Public Interest Alberta, Alberta College of Social Workers.

While it is crucial for government programs to focus on poverty reduction among all vulnerable populations in the country, this report focuses specifically on child poverty. This is because when children experience poverty, they are more vulnerable to various disadvantages and barriers later in life in the areas of employment, education, health, home ownership, and others. If governments of all levels can address the root causes of poverty such as inadequate income, lack of affordable housing, violence, food insecurity, discrimination, and others, the cycle of poverty can be broken and all children in Canada could have access to the resources needed for them to thrive (Boros and Pettes, 2015). Children and teens living in poverty are also more vulnerable to experiencing poor academic achievement, dropping out of school, abuse, neglect, behavioural and emotional problems, physical health struggles, and developmental delays. These challenges are worsened by the barriers that families and children living in poverty experience when they try to access health services (American Psychological Association, 2017).

Created Date Sunday, 01 October 2017
Modified Date Sunday, 01 October 2017
Filesize 508 Kilobytes

Child Benefit Enhancements Making a Difference for Low Income Families

Child Benefit Enhancements Making a Difference for Low Income Families
Prepared by John Kolkman
Research Associate, Edmonton Social Planning Council
Created Date Sunday, 01 October 2017
Modified Date Sunday, 01 October 2017
Filesize 574 Kilobytes

Access To Justice: The Great Gap in Canada’s Justice System

Access To Justice: The Great Gap in Canada's Justice System
Maxwell Jenkins, Research Assistant - Edmonton Social Planning Council
Created Date Thursday, 09 February 2017
Filesize 923 Kilobytes

A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton: Update 2017

The two years since ESPC published A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton have been challenging ones for the city of Edmonton and its residents.

This report updates many of the poverty trends and challenges identified two years within the context of broader social and economic trends in our community. This profile updates the actions the City could take within its jurisdiction to help work towards eliminating poverty and in keeping with the Poverty Roadmap approved by City Council.

This profile update provides data and analysis to answer the following questions:

  • What is the overall picture of poverty in Edmonton, and how has it changed in the past two years?
  • How does poverty vary across age, gender, and households in the city? What trends are we seeing among different population groups?
  • Who is impacted most by poverty? What population groups are at higher risk of experiencing poverty than others? (i.e., Indigenous people, recent immigrant/refugees, low income workers, women children and youth.)
  • What are the emerging trends impacting poverty in Edmonton or influencing the work on eliminating poverty?
Created Date Tuesday, 01 November 2016
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 214 Kilobytes

Calculating Edmonton’s Living Wage: Other Family Types 2016 Update

The 2016 living wage for Edmonton is $16.69 per hour. This is the amount that a family of four with two parents who work full-time require to live in economic stability and maintain a modest standard of living. This includes being able to afford basic necessities (food, shelter, utilities, clothing, transportation, etc.), to support healthy child development, to avoid financial stress, and to participate in their communities. However, this is not the only family type represented in Edmonton; each family type will have a different living wage due mainly to differences in expenses and government transfers. We have also calculated the living wages for a lone parent family and a single adult. These calculations are based on BC’s “Calculation Guide” (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives).

The 2016 living wage for lone parents is $18.15 per hour.

The 2016 living wage for single adults is $17.81 per hour.

For the main Edmonton Living Wage 2016 update, which includes a complete summary of the living wage, the case for a living wage, and written summaries of the calculations, please visit our website at edmontonsocialplanning.ca or use the direct link http://edmontonsocialplanning.ca/index.php/news/espc-news/265-more-than-minimum-calculating-edmonton-s-living-wage-2016-update.

Download the Other Family Types Living Wage Report today.

Created Date Tuesday, 10 May 2016
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 355 Kilobytes

Issues in the Treatment of Youth in Conflict at the Youth Restorative Action Project

This paper identifies the issues surrounding the treatment of youth in conflict with the law, from the perspective of youth and youth workers at the Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP). The objectives of treatment are the reintegration of youth within their community, and reducing the re-offence rates. The paper compares the perspectives of the individuals at YRAP to current best practices, and offers recommendations in the treatment of youth in conflict with the law. A brief overview of current best practices revealed that program integrity and a program length of less than six months was correlated with lower rates of re-offence. The practice of Restorative Justice approaches was effective for lowering rates of re-offence, and left both victim and offender participants more satisfied than those that did not participate in such programs. The involvement of youth in the development of personalized treatment was also deemed important. Finally, collaboration between service organizations, especially in the form of Wraparound services, was recommended in the literature.

Disclaimer: This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the Edmonton Social Planning Council, but is based on the work and opinions of the author.

In 2015, Andrew Ha served as the Edmonton Social Planning Council’s Social Justice Intern. Our Social Justice Intern is a volunteer program, which provides students at an Albertan post-secondary institution the opportunity to complete a research project on a local social issue. This initiative is supported by Volunteer Alberta’s Serving Communities Internship Program (SCIP). The following report is the result of his work in this position. For more information about the ESPC’s Social Justice Internship, you can reach us at the following address:

Social Justice Internship
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Suite 37, 9912-106 St. Edmonton, AB T5K 1C5
Phone: 780-423-2031
www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca

Created Date Tuesday, 12 April 2016
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 1012 Kilobytes

The Path Forward: Opportunities to End Child Poverty in Alberta

The past year has been one of dramatic political and economic change in Alberta.

There were changes in governments at the provincial and federal levels. Both Alberta’s economy and public finances are being negatively impacted by the collapse in energy prices with the prospect of only modest recovery in the foreseeable future.

Despite these challenges, the new Alberta government has made some promising investments in poverty reduction. Many of these investments have been championed by Alberta anti-poverty advocates for many years.

It will take more than money to end child poverty in this province. Yet, without additional investment in key solutions, the goal of ending child poverty will not be achieved.

This marks the fifth year of a collaboration between the Edmonton Social Planning Council, Public Interest Alberta, and the Alberta College of Social Workers. The purpose of this report is to do a checkup of child and family poverty in this province, and identify the most effective ways of ending it.

This report contains updated information on the extent of child and family poverty in Alberta. Data on child poverty numbers and rates in this year’s report is from compilations by Statistics Canada from tax returns filed by Alberta families.

Created Date Tuesday, 30 June 2015
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 1.42 Megabytes

More Than Minimum - Calculating Edmonton’s Living Wage

For many years, the City of Edmonton has experienced strong population and employment growth, significantly above the national average. Many have praised the city for its high standard of living, skilled population and plentiful opportunities. But what is becoming increasingly clear is that all citizens have not shared in this optimistic outlook. The most recent available data finds that one in eight Edmontonians live in poverty. One in five children live in a poor family.

This report attempts to calculate what it actually costs to live a basic or modest life. The calculation is based on a framework developed by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA). Since it was created, the framework has been used by cities across Canada to calculate each city’s living wage.

We have calculated Edmonton’s living wage to be $17.36 per hour. This hourly wage is determined by using the CCPA framework that utilizes a common household structure in order to enable comparisons between municipalities.

Edmonton’s living wage, like other cities’ living wages, is based on the income, expenses and government income transfers of a family of four. This family lives in a rented three-bedroom apartment. They have two children, one aged three and the other aged seven. One parent drives the family car to work while the other takes public transit. For the purposes of this calculation, both parents work 35 hours a week and earn $17.36 per hour to pay for their food, shelter, utilities, clothing, transportation, child care, school fees, post-secondary tuition and more. This family’s available income, including government income transfers, is $68,261.32.

It is important to also note what this calculation does not take into account: common expenses such as debt payments, savings for retirement, vacation, or savings for the children’s post-secondary education.

Once the family’s expenses have been added up, this report looks at the income side of the family’s balance sheet, including both employment income and a wide range of government transfers and supports such as child care benefits.

So, now that we have a living wage calculation for Edmonton, what do we do with it? This living wage calculation can serve as a guide to any employer in the public, private or not-for-profit sector that chooses to become a living wage employer. This living wage provides a current and realistic picture of what it actually costs for a family of four to maintain a modest standard of living in Edmonton.

Created Date Wednesday, 14 January 2015
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 5.67 Megabytes

A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton

While most Edmontonians have good jobs and adequate incomes, a new report on poverty in Edmonton shows that one in eight Edmontonians live in poverty and one in five children live in a poor family. A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton gathers the latest federal, provincial and municipal data on income, employment, poverty by family size, housing, homelessness and food bank use.

Created Date Monday, 06 October 2014
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 533 Kilobytes

Survey of Edmontonians - Leger Report

Leger was contracted by the Edmonton Community Foundation (ECF) to conduct a survey with Edmontonians regarding various aspects of life in Edmonton. 401 interviews were conducted on June 17-18, 2014 on the internet via secured access to the online questionnaire.

Created Date Wednesday, 13 February 2013
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 250 Kilobytes

Impact of Summer Temporary Employment Program Elimination in 2013

Members of the InterCity Forum on Social Policy (ICFSP) were concerned about the elimination of the STEP and its impact on municipalities. ICFSP members decided to develop and distribute a survey to members and key contacts within their communities to gauge the scope of this impact.

Created Date Friday, 25 November 2011
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 2.29 Megabytes

In This Together Ending Poverty in Alberta

Title: In this Together: Ending Poverty in Alberta)
Author(s): Kolkman, John, and Ahorro, Joseph
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council, Alberta College of Social Workers, Public Interest Alberta
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract: Co-published by the Edmonton Social Planning Council, the Alberta College of Social Workers and Public Interest Alberta, "In This Together: Ending Poverty in Alberta" identifies the need for a province-wide poverty reduction strategy in Alberta. It also discusses how the Government of Alberta could reduce poverty by introducing new programs and expanding pre-existing ones that assist low-income individuals and families.
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Monday, 30 November 2009
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 911 Kilobytes

The Way We Live: Edmonton's People Plan: The Quality of Life Needs & Priorities of Edmontonians Facing Social & Economic Barriers

Prepared by the Edmonton Social Planning Council for the City of Edmonton, Community Services Department, November 30, 2009.

Created Date Saturday, 15 March 2008
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 492 Kilobytes

2008 September It is Time To Step Up: Recommendations to Address Rental Housing Issues in Edmonton

Title: It is Time to Step Up: Recommendations to Address Housing Issues in Edmonton.
Author(s): Kolkman, John
Citation: A companion report to "Not Just a Roof Over our Heads"
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2008
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Sunday, 05 November 1967
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 295 Kilobytes

1967 Alberta Mental Health Study

Title: Alberta Mental Health Study
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Health issues - health in Alberta|split|Health issues - mental health
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1967
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Monday, 16 October 1961
Modified Date Thursday, 23 February 2017
Filesize 493 Kilobytes

1961 October Report of Council Self-Study Committee Part II - The Role of The Council

Title: Report of council self-study committee (part II) : the role of the council.
Corporate Author: Council of Community Services of Edmonton and District
Subject: Program evaluation - general
Publisher: Council of Community Services of Edmonton and District
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1961
Language: English
Material Type: Report

ESPC headquarters also feature a library, where hard-copies of a number of publications are stored. Everyone is welcome to browse the materials;memberscan borrow items.  Individuals looking for a quiet research spot or groups looking for a comfortable meeting space can contact us to book time in the library.

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Is there something missing from our library? Are you looking for help with your research? We'd love to hear from you!  Email johnk@edmontonsocialplanning.ca or call 780.423.2031 x 350

 

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