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  • A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update

    A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update

    Read the full report (click on the link):A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update Click to download: 2016 Federal Census Neighbourhood Summary Click to download: Map: Prevalence of Low Income After-Tax (All Ages) Click to download: Map: Prevalence of Low Income After-Tax (0 to 17) INTRODUCTION Poverty affects people from all walks of life – young, old, employed, unemployed, those Read More
  • 2019 Vital Topics - Indigenous Women in Alberta

    2019 Vital Topics - Indigenous Women in Alberta

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton.  This edition focuses on Indigenous Women in Alberta.   Download: Vital Topic - Indigenous Women in Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - The Arts

    2018 Vital Topics - The Arts

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton.  This edition focuses on The Arts. ARTS include a wide variety of creative disciplines including: Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Senior Women in Edmonton

    2018 Vital Topics - Senior Women in Edmonton

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
  • Edmonton Vital Signs 2018

    Edmonton Vital Signs 2018

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, Vital Topics, that are timely and important to Edmonton - specifically Women, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Edmonton, Visible Minority Women, and Senior Women. Each of these topics appear in Read More
  • CBC News - Living wage in Edmonton is going up but that isn't good

    CBC News - Living wage in Edmonton is going up but that isn't good

    Radio Active with Adrienne Pan Interview with Sandra Ngo, Edmonton Social Planning Council. Click here to listen to the interview   Read More
  • Media Release: Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update

    Media Release: Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update

    June 21, 2018 For Immediate Release Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update Contending with Costs For the first time in 2 years, the living wage for Edmonton has risen. For 2018, an income earner must make $16.48 per hour to support a family of four, an increase of $0.17 per hour from last year’s living wage. The living wage is intended Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

    2018 Vital Topics - Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Visible Minority Women in Edmonton

    2018 Vital Topics - Visible Minority Women in Edmonton

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
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by: John Cotter, The Canadian Press

EDMONTON - The Catholic and public school boards in Edmonton want Premier Alison Redford to do more to reduce child poverty in Alberta.

Both boards have passed motions endorsing a report written by social agencies on the need for better programs to help the poor.

But the boards differ on whether they support the report's call for increasing Alberta's corporate tax rate and replacing the 10 per cent flat income tax with a progressive income tax system to help fund the changes.

The Edmonton Catholic board sent a letter to Redford dated Jan. 10 stating its position.

"I am writing to let you and the Government of Alberta know of the Board's support for the recommendations contained in the report and in particular, the recommendation for modification of Alberta's provincial tax structure in order to help end child poverty by 2017," reads the letter signed by Cindy Olsen, chairwoman of Edmonton Catholic Schools.

The Edmonton Public board passed a different motion Tuesday in support of the report prepared by the Alberta College of Social Workers, Public Interest Alberta and the Edmonton Social Planning Council.

However, some public school trustees said the letter to be sent to Redford should avoid any mention of the tax change proposals over fear of how they would be interpreted by the government.

Public board chairwoman Sarah Hoffman said she will word her letter to the premier to reflect the board's concerns.

"I think we can get this one right and make sure that we don't offend anyone, but at the same time saying something strongly around our commitment to serving the students as best we can," Hoffman said.

Called "From Words to Action," the report released in November says changes to the tax system would generate more than $1 billion per year that could be used to help pay for better child benefits, more affordable housing, full-day kindergarten for vulnerable children and better early childhood development programs.

The report estimates there were 84,000 children in the province in 2011 whose families were below the low-income poverty line.

During the 2012 provincial election campaign, Redford promised to eliminate child poverty in five years.

The report says the government actually chose to cut rather than bolster some social assistance programs in its last budget.

Olsen said members of the Catholic school board are not radicals, they just feel that child poverty has become an invisible issue.

She hopes the Catholic board's letter will focus attention on something that educators see in the classroom every day: Children who are hungry, have health problems, can't concentrate, have low socialization skills or live in inadequate housing.

How does a child learn in that kind of situation?

"The issue is that people can't see it. They don't want to see it," Olsen said in an interview.

"We have to put focus on it. We have to take action so that the government realizes how important that this actually is to Albertans - to our province and to our future."

Olsen said if the government can find the money for programs to reduce child poverty without changing the tax system, that would be great.

But she said the status quo is not acceptable because the problem of child poverty is getting worse.

Alberta's Human Services Department has not responded to the report.

Last spring, the government launched a poverty reduction review called "Together We Raise Tomorrow."

Kathy Telfer, a department spokeswoman, said the government has been seeking input from community groups and is now working on a report that will be presented to minister Manmeet Bhullar in the coming months.

Telfer said it's too soon to say if the tax change suggestions in the report will be considered or if the government will announce any new steps to reduce child poverty in its coming budget.

by: Leah Germain

Edmonton's child poverty rate is the highest in the province according to a new report, with one in six local children living in poverty.

"It is partly because we are a little bit of a magnet, particularly we have more recent immigrants in Edmonton you tend to earn lower incomes and tend to live in poverty. We (also) have the highest aboriginal population in the province," said John Kolkman, research coordinator for Edmonton Social Planning Council.

The "From Words to Action" report found that in 2011 one in 10 children - approximately 84,000 - were living in poverty in Alberta.

"In the province of Alberta, the highest rates of child poverty, even though it does fluctuate from year to year are within the City of Edmonton," said Kolkman. The report was co-authored by Public Interest Alberta, Edmonton Social Planning Council and the Alberta College of Social Workers.

by: Canadian Press, The Globe and Mail

A report says more than 10 per cent of Alberta children were living in poverty in 2011. The authors of the report are urging Premier Alison Redford to come through on an election promise to eliminate child poverty by 2017.

The report says there were 84,000 children whose families were below the low-income measure after taxes.

The survey was done by Public Interest Alberta, the Edmonton Social Planning Council and the Alberta College of Social Workers.

The report also says that almost 60 per cent of kids in poverty had at least one parent working full-time.

They say that won't be achieved unless the government invests in social programs and public services to support families in need.

According to UNICEF estimates from 2012, Canada's national child poverty rate is 14 per cent, ranking 24th out of 35 industrialized countries.

Another report released Tuesday by the B.C. child and youth advocacy group First Call said B.C.'s child poverty rate is 18.6 per cent. Manitoba's rate, the second-highest in the country, stands at 17.3 per cent.

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Video Feature

Global News - 1 in 6 Alberta children lives below poverty line

Read more about the Edmonton Social Planning Council report on child poverty in Alberta.

Alberta Child Poverty Report - 2018 Click to Download