News and Announcements
Learn More About ESPC In The News, News Releases, And General News About The Organization.
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  • A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update

    A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update

    Read the full report (click on the link):A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton - May 2019 Update Click to download: 2016 Federal Census Neighbourhood Summary Click to download: Map: Prevalence of Low Income After-Tax (All Ages) Click to download: Map: Prevalence of Low Income After-Tax (0 to 17) INTRODUCTION Poverty affects people from all walks of life – young, old, employed, unemployed, those Read More
  • 2019 Vital Topics - Indigenous Women in Alberta

    2019 Vital Topics - Indigenous Women in Alberta

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton.  This edition focuses on Indigenous Women in Alberta.   Download: Vital Topic - Indigenous Women in Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - The Arts

    2018 Vital Topics - The Arts

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton.  This edition focuses on The Arts. ARTS include a wide variety of creative disciplines including: Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Senior Women in Edmonton

    2018 Vital Topics - Senior Women in Edmonton

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
  • Edmonton Vital Signs 2018

    Edmonton Vital Signs 2018

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, Vital Topics, that are timely and important to Edmonton - specifically Women, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Edmonton, Visible Minority Women, and Senior Women. Each of these topics appear in Read More
  • CBC News - Living wage in Edmonton is going up but that isn't good

    CBC News - Living wage in Edmonton is going up but that isn't good

    Radio Active with Adrienne Pan Interview with Sandra Ngo, Edmonton Social Planning Council. Click here to listen to the interview   Read More
  • Media Release: Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update

    Media Release: Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update

    June 21, 2018 For Immediate Release Edmonton Living Wage 2018 Update Contending with Costs For the first time in 2 years, the living wage for Edmonton has risen. For 2018, an income earner must make $16.48 per hour to support a family of four, an increase of $0.17 per hour from last year’s living wage. The living wage is intended Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

    2018 Vital Topics - Sexual Orientation & Gender Identity

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
  • 2018 Vital Topics - Visible Minority Women in Edmonton

    2018 Vital Topics - Visible Minority Women in Edmonton

    Edmonton Vital Signs is an annual check-up conducted by Edmonton Community Foundation, in partnership with Edmonton Social Planning Council, to measure how the community is doing. This year we will also be focusing on individual issues, VITAL TOPICS, that are timely and important to Edmonton. Watch for these in each issue of Legacy in Action, and in the full issue Read More
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The Edmonton Social Planning Council, a charitable,

 non-profit social research and community engagement agency, is seeking a

 

Research Coordinator

Full time/Permanent position  

 

Reporting to the Executive Director, the Research Coordinator is responsible for planning, coordinating, and evaluating the research and policy analysis function of the Council. This includes direct involvement in research conducted by the Council.  In collaboration with the staff team, the Coordinator develops and implements the annual research agenda. The Coordinator demonstrates an excellent understanding of research methods, particularly community based research, and the capacity to conduct research in an ethical manner that meets rigorous standards.  Working in collaboration with colleagues from the larger research community, the Coordinator examines relevant social policies and issues, and provides timely and practical analysis that reflects the vision and mission of the Council.

 

Required Skills:

  • Minimum Bachelor degree in Social Sciences with a research emphasis.
  • Experience in research design and implementation, project management, analysis and report writing.
  • Experience working with Microsoft Office applications, social media tools and publishing software.
  • Exceptional written and verbal communications and presentation skills.
  • Experience supervising/mentoring students.
  • Professional work experience in areas of affordable housing and homelessness, food security and social inclusion is considered an asset.

 

SalaryRange: $48,000.00 to $53,000.00 annually (commensurate with experience)

The Council offers an excellent benefit plan and pension.

Download the job description here.Please submit application letter and resume plus a sample of your professional writing by electronic mail no later than 4:00 p.m. October 7, 2016. We thank applicants in advance for their submissions, but we will only contact those people who will be interviewed for the position. Please submit applications to:

 

 

Edmonton Social Planning Council

Attn: Susan Morrissey, Executive Director

#37, 9912-106 Street

Edmonton, AB   T5K 1C5

E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

We cordially invite you to join us for the report launch of VitalSigns(TM) in conjunction with the Edmonton Community Foundation!

We'll serve a light lunch while you find out why immigration is important to Edmonton, how immigrants and refugees contribute to our society, and more!

Join us at the Stanley Milner Library, Edmonton Room, on October 4th at 11:30 am.

The living wage is meant to provide families with basic economic stability and maintain a modest standard of living.The living wage, unlike the minimum wage, is the actual amount that earners need to make to be able to live in a specific community.

The 2016 living wage for Edmonton is $16.69 per hour. This is the amount that a family of four with two parents who work full-time require to live in economic stability and maintain a modest standard of living. This includes being able to afford basic necessities (food, shelter, utilities, clothing, transportation, etc.), to support healthy child development, to avoid financial stress, and to participate in their communities.

The living wage for Edmonton was first calculated in 2015. Each year the living wage is updated to reflect social and economic changes. Since last year, Edmonton’s living wage rate dropped by $0.67. The drop in the living wage is due to changes in government taxes and transfers, particularly in increased benefits through the new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) as well as the Enhanced Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit (AFETC).

Moving forward, the ESPC hopes to work alongside stakeholders and community partners, including the City of Edmonton, to begin the process of formally recognizing living wage employers.

Download the full report, More than Minimum: Calculating Edmonton’s Living Wage: 2016 Update, here!

Learn about the push for a $15/h minimum wage and why labour groups think it’s important. Then, learn about Edmonton’s living wage, which is $16.69/h. What’s the difference between a minimum and a living wage? Why does the ESPC advocate for a living wage? Our two presenters, Gil McGowan of the Alberta Federation of Labour and John Kolkman of the Edmonton Social Planning Council are ready to present their cases and answer your questions.

Add the event to your calendar with Facebook or from the EPL calendar.

Join us in our series of free lunchtime talks about social issues and learn about diverse ways to help create a community in which all people are full and valued participants.

For 76 years, the ESPC has been an important player in social research and advocacy in the Edmonton region and beyond.

To build on this strong history, and to guide future success, the ESPC has developed a new Strategic Framework. The Framework defines a bold, new organizational vision that positions the ESPC as the community’s go-to organization for relevant, quality research on social issues.

Developed between October 2015 and March 2016, both board and staff members worked together to identify options for the future of the organization. Mark Holmgren Consulting aided the planning process by providing advice and facilitation assistance through several working sessions. These sessions allowed staff and board members to grapple with defining the way ahead for ESPC. The result is a framework that will guide decision making in the organization and clearly articulates ESPC’s role in the community.

An important component of the framework is a revised mission statement: “Through rigorous research, detailed analysis, and community engagement, we deepen community understanding of social issues, influence policy, and spark collaborative actions that lead to positive social change.

The Framework also establishes three impact statements—high-level statements that define the organization’s desired outcomes—through our work, we seek to achieve:

  • An informed community that is knowledgeable about social issues, challenges, and potential actions;
  • An engaged community that works together to determine priorities and organize efforts; and
  • A changed community that benefits from positive social change.

A set of guiding principles help to describe the type of organization we strive to be. For example, the Framework directs the ESPC to be an independent and nonpartisan organization that prioritizes research that can lead to action. The plan also prioritizes working with diverse partners and ensuring a wide range of audiences can access our reports.

The Framework also defines a set of strategies to guide the operational activities of the ESPC. These strategies confirm the Council’s leadership role in conducting and disseminating research to help Edmontonians understand current issues, policies, and potential courses of action. The strategies also reaffirm our commitment to work in partnership with other organizations to leverage resources and achieve shared goals.

The Framework defines several strategic shifts for the organization. For example, the Framework directs the Council to focus on supporting learning outcomes and capacity building for our partner organizations. The Framework also commits to enhancing the way we share information, whether through online forums or in-person events.

Moving forward, the Framework will guide the development of an operations plan and a communications strategy for the organization. Click here to download the ESPC 2016 Strategic Framework.
 

 
  • Donations

    Your donation helps us do our work. It keeps our social research current and comprehensive. It allows us to take on bigger projects and make a greater impact in the community. It strengthens our voice—your voice, and the voices of those who lack the opportunity to speak for themselves. All donations are tax deductible, a tax reciept will be issued upon receipt of your donation. (Charitable Tax # 10729 31 95 RP 001)

    Donate Now
  • Membership

    The strength of our voice is dependent upon the support of people and organizations concerned about social issues—people like you. By getting involved with the Edmonton Social Planning Council, you add your voice to our message of positive social development and policy change.

    Become a Member
  • Volunteer

    To inquire directly about volunteer opportunities with the Edmonton Social Planning Council, please contact johnk@edmontonsocialplanning.ca or call 780-423-2031 ext. 356. Thank you for your interest in the Edmonton Social Planning Council

    Volunteer!
  • Become a Board Member

    If you are passionate about equitable social policy and making a difference in your community, consider supporting the Edmonton Social Planning Council by joining our team as a volunteer member of our Board of Directors.

    Read More