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F.06 IMMIGRATION

Documents

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Modified Date Thursday, 04 May 2017
Filesize 345 Bytes

2012 ESPC Social Justice Internship The role of stakeholders in integrating skilled immigrants into the workforce

Title:The role of stakeholders in integrating skilled immigrants into the workforce
Autho(s):Muthui, Daniel
Editor:MacDonald, Stephen
Subject:Immigration - employment, foreign qualifications|split|Immigration - planning, policy|split|Immigration - programs, services|split|Immigration - statistics, studies
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

This paper explores recent immigrants’ access to the Canadian job market by focusing on the barriers they encounter as they try to find work that is commensurate with their education, skills and work experience. It highlights the employment experiences of recent immigrants to Canada and Alberta (with an emphasis on Edmonton) and proposes actions that the City of Edmonton and other stakeholders can take to identify immigrants’ skills and help them find employment opportunities related to their education and previous work experience. [Taken from Introduction]

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 21 July 2016
Filesize 1.04 Megabytes

2010 Brain Drain

Title:Brain gain, drain & waste: the experiences of internationally educated health professionals in Canada.
Author(s):Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn|split|Neiterman, Elena|split|LeBrun, Jane|split|Viers, Ken|split|Winkup, Judi
Subject:Immigration - employment, foreign qualifications
Publisher:University of Ottawa
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

Canada has historically relied on internatonally educated health professionals (IEHPs) to address shortages in rural a nd remote locatons and hard to fll positons within its health care system. It contnues to do so and, while this has been true for medical and nursing labour in the past, this is now also true for midwives. At the same tme, we hear of numerous accounts of IEHPs who are not able to practce their profession in Canada. The barriers to practce for IEHPs – what some have labelled the ‘brain waste’ problem – have recently become a signifcant concern for Canadians. The difcultes this causes are not limited to the Canadian context – in terms of lost labour, and possible solutons to its human resource crises – there are important implicatons for the countries from which health care providers migrate.
This study was designed to fll some of these gaps in our knowledge by examining:
the experiences of internatonally educated physicians, nurses and midwives who were pursuing professional integraton, who have achieved it, and who have decided to redirect their eforts; and
the barriers and facilitators they experienced along the way that they feel infuenced their relatve success at becoming integrated into provincial health care systems in Canada.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 28 January 2016
Filesize 2.13 Megabytes

2004 Attracting New Immigrants

 

Title:Size matters: attracting new immigrants to Canadian cities.
Author(s):Hyndman, Jennifer|split|Schuurman, Nadine
Subject:Immigration - resettlement|split|Urban issues - general
Publisher:The Vancouver Centre
Place of Publication:Vancouver
Date of Publication:2004
Abstract:

Many small and medium-sized cities in Canada are witnessing a decline in their populations. Accordingly, the idea of attracting new immigrants to such locations is a pressing political and policy issue. The research presented uses first wave findings from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (LSIC) to construct an index that maps which cities new immigrants find most attractive. The study focuses on cities outside of Greater Vancouver in British Columbia.

Language:English
Series:Research on Immigration and Integration in the Metropolis Working Paper Series

Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 256 Kilobytes

2002 Simmering Pot

 

Title:The simmering pot boils over: racist backlash in Edmonton after September 11.
Author(s):Khalema, Ernest|split|Hay, Charlene|split|Wannas-Jones, Jenny
Subject:Racism
Publisher:Northern Alberta Alliance on Race Relations (NAARR)
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2002
Abstract:

This report relies on a literature review and consultations with the general public and ethno-cultural groups to identify the issues, concerns and experiences in the aftermath of September 11. The project explores the scope and nature of bias following the September 11 events and their impact on specific ethno-cultural and religious groups, including Arabs, Muslims, East Asians, and other racial minorities.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 09 July 2015
Filesize 928 Kilobytes

1991 December First Reading - Welcome to Canada

Created Date Wednesday, 05 November 2014
Filesize 2.40 Megabytes

1963 June Insights into Cultural Differences

 

Title:Insights into cultural differences : a seminar for people working with ethnic groups in the Edmonton district.
Subject:Racism
Publisher:Edmonton Welfare Council
Canadian Citizenship Branch
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1963
Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Friday, 28 February 2014
Modified Date Friday, 28 February 2014
Filesize 764 Kilobytes

Early Cultural and Economic Adaptation Newcomers

Abstract:

Using ethnographic data, this study reports on the early sociocultural and economic experiences of the Bangladesh immigrant and non-immigrant families living in the Michener Park area in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Research findings show that newcomers experienced a wide range of social and economic constraints during their initial stage of sociocultural and economic adaptation to life in Edmonton. Lack of English language proficiency, Canadian job experience, or lack of Canadian education and training facilities, and nature of residency status in Canada led these newcomers to experience economic hardship in the earliest months of their new life in Canada. The aim of this research, therefore, was to examine: (a) why do these people come to Canada and what social and economic experiences have they had while living in Edmonton? (b) What barriers do they encounter that prevent them from obtaining their preferred job, how does this affect their household income and how do they manage to survive? This paper summarizes the responses of the newcomers who agreed to participate in this research project. The paper concludes with policy recommendations made by participants that could help newcomers overcome existing job barriers for the immigrant and non-immigrant families living in Edmonton.

Key Words: Economic hardship, Newcomers, job barriers, language proficiency, job experiences, references

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Filesize 1015 Kilobytes

2011 Rights Review

 

Title:Rights in review
Corporate Author: Canadian Council for Refugees
Subject:Immigration - refugees
Publisher:Canadian Council for Refugees
Place of Publication:Montréal
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

The Canadian Council for Refugees believes in treating refugees and immigrants fairly and honourably. Decisions made need to be fully independent. And our policies and practices need to be affordable – for refugees and immigrants, and for Canadians. This document measures how Canada is meeting the needs of refugees.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Filesize 138 Kilobytes

2011 Rebuilding Professional Lives

 

Title:Rebuilding professional lives: immigrant professionals working in the Ontario settlement sector.
Author(s):Türegün, Adnan
Subject:Immigration - employment, foreign qualifications
Publisher:CERIS - The Ontario Metropolis Centre
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

This study looks at the reality of a particular group of foreign-born and -trained professionals in Ontario. These are the professionals who did not get to practise their respective professions after immigration but acquired a new profession in the form of settlement work. The study detects their pre-immigration education and work history, the reasons they left their countries of origin or permanent residence for Canada, the expectations they had, the choices they made about pursuing professional practice, the efforts they put towards that or some alternative goal, and their eventual professional reconstitution as settlement workers.

Language:English
 
Material Type:Article


Created Date Wednesday, 25 August 2010
Filesize 1.16 Megabytes

2011 Alberta Immigration Progress

Title:Alberta immigration progress report 2011
Corporate Author: Government of Alberta
Subject:Immigration - general
Publisher:Government of Alberta
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

In October 2005, the Alberta government announced Supporting Immigrants and Immigration to Alberta (SIIA), an immigration policy for the province. The policy outlines a strategic framework for a more co-ordinated approach across ministries to address the needs of Alberta’s immigrant population.
Alberta’s approach to immigration addresses the attraction and retention of immigrants. The GoA recognizes progress in both areas is essential to realize the vision for immigration outlined in SIIA:
In meeting the goals of SIIA, activities are being pursued across four strategic directions: (1) Welcoming communities, (2) Attracting immigrants to Alberta, (3) Living in Alberta, (4) Working in Alberta.
This report highlights key achievements and progress under the four strategic directions from the time of SIIA’s implementation in October 2005 to December 2010. The report also highlights recent achievements and progress on TFW matters.

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 1.24 Megabytes

2010 Settlement of Newcomers

Title:Settlement of Newcomers to Canada
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Social Workers
Citation:Canadian Social Work Vol 12 (1) Fall 2010
Subject:Immigration - resettlement
Publisher:Canadian Association of Social Workers
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

The Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) is pleased to publish a special issue on policy and settlement practice with immigrants and refugees in the Canadian Social Work (CSW) journal.
This collection of articles will raise awareness—within the social work profession, contribute to knowledge and skills for practice, and promote the roles and functions of social work among the policy makers and practitioners in the field of immigrant and refugee settlement.

Language:English
 Material Type:Journal

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 1.24 Megabytes

2010 Migrant Care Workers

Title:The role of migrant care workers in aging societies: report on research findings in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada and the United States.
Corporate Author: IOM International Organization for Migration
Citation:Report no. 41
Subject:Employment - planning, policy|split|Immigration - employment, foreign qualifications
Publisher:IOM International Organization for Migration
Place of Publication:Geneva
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

The ageing of the population presents serious challenges to developed Western nations, particularly those managing the retirement and care of a growing number of older persons. The ageing population will generate an increasing demand for caregivers, a demand made challenging because of the declining availability of nativeborn caregivers compounded by various factors including declining family care of older people, increasing life expectancy of infirm elderly and the increasing demand for social caregivers, often in home settings. Health care institutions and long-term care facilities have been turning to the foreign born to address shortages of workers, reflecting a parallel trend in the migration of health care workers worldwide. Indeed, migrants already play a significant role in the care of older persons.

This report presents the comparative results of a research project on the role of migrants in the workforce of caregivers for the elderly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada and the United States. The purpose of the study is to examine 1) the contextual factors influencing current and future demand for care workers in an ageing society, particularly migrant care workers; 2) the experiences of migrant workers, of their employers, and of older people in institutional care (residential and nursing care homes) and in homebased care; 3) the implications of the employment of migrant workers in the care of older people for the working conditions of the migrants concerned and for the quality of care; and 4) the implications of these findings for the future care of older people and for migration policy and practice.

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 853 Kilobytes

2010 Refugee Mental Health

Title:Refugee mental health: promising practices and partnership building resources.
Corporate Author: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Subject:Health issues - mental health|split|Immigration - health issues|split|Immigration - refugees
Publisher:Centre for Addiction and Mental Health
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

This guide is for people who work with refugees in Canada, particularly those who provide settlement, health and other social support services. The material is written for front line workers, program managers and the leaders of agencies, and is informed by their ideas and expertise.

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 976 Kilobytes

2010 Reconfiguring Settlements

Title:Reconfiguring settlement and integration: a service provider strategy for innovation and results.
Author(s):Burstein, Meyer
Corporate Author: Canadian Immigrant Settlement Sector Alliance
Subject:Immigration - resettlement
Publisher:Canadian Immigrant Settlement Sector Alliance
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

This study was commissioned by CISSA-ACSEI: the Canadian Immigrant Settlement Sector Alliance - Alliance canadienne du secteur de l’établissement des immigrants. CISSA/ACSEI was formed in March 2005 to represent the immigrant settlement sector and to bring the sector’s expertise to bear on public policies and programs for enhancing the settlement and integration of immigrants and refugees. CISSA-ACSEI is dedicated to creating a society in which all immigrants and refugees are able to participate fully. The study is consistent with this objective. Its purpose is to take stock of emerging trends and to map a way forward that will allow settlement service providers to acquire the tools and capacities they need to partner with governments in meeting the challenges facing both newcomers and the communities in which they settle.
CISSA-ACSEI commends the study to interested stakeholders as a first, serious step towards fundamental realignment in how the sector is organized and how it comports itself. Settlement organizations want to play a larger role in shaping and contributing to the future of Canada. They feel they have a great deal to offer. The study suggests ideas for increasing their involvement and influence.

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 68 Kilobytes

2010 Immigration for Young Citizens

Title:Immigration: for young citizens.
Author(s):Kent, Tom
Subject:Immigration - general
Publisher:Caledon Institute of Social Policy
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

Immigration to Canada is in chaos. The federal government’s response to the problems has been to shuffle much of its responsibility to provincial governments and to employers recruiting for ostensibly temporary work. In the resulting confusion, the national purpose for immigration is lost. Some easements, such as better settlement services and language upgrading, are widely urged but little done. At best, they are only band-aids. Fundamental changes are needed.

Table Of Contents:

Mobility’s winners and losers 1 Youth is the priority 2 Shuffled responsibility 3 Temporaries 5 The special non-Canadians 6 Notwithstanding 7 Some orphans, no grannies 8 New selectivity 9 Citizens only 10 Taxpayers all 12 In sum 14 Conclusion 15

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 2.55 Megabytes

2010 Immigrant Mental Health

Title:Immigrant mental health
Variant Title:La santé mentale des immigrants
Citation:Issue of "Canadian Issues" (Summer 2010)
Subject:Immigration - health issues|split|Health issues - mental health
Publisher:Metropolis
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

This collection of articles illustrates a broad spectrum of knowledge on migrant mental health, building and assessing evidence from a variety of sources: clinical practice, community-based research, population surveys and health surveillance. The articles address a range of conceptual, methodological and measurement issues and identify key data and research gaps.

Language:English
 Material Type:Collection of Articles

Created Date Wednesday, 21 July 2010
Filesize 2.06 Megabytes

2010 Educational Pathways

 

Title:Educational pathways and academic performance of youth of immigrant origin in Toronto
Author(s):Anisef, Paul|split|Brown, Robert|split|Sweet, Robert|split|Walters, David
Subject:Education - general|split|Immigration - general|split|Youth - programs, services
Publisher:Ryerson University, School of Early Childhood Education
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

This paper examines the educational pathways of a cohort of students who started high school in fall 2000 within the Toronto District Board of Education (TDSB) and is derived from a larger pan-Canadian study of students in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver who were expected to graduate in 2004 if they did not experience delays. Male students – those who entered high school a year older than the average age, those who moved between schools, those who come from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds, and those who attended socio-economically disadvantaged schools – were less likely to graduate, regardless of language. The fact that ESL instruction for non-English speakers is negatively associated with graduation suggests that such assistance is not sufficient to attain necessary achievement levels. Immigrant students whose language is not English were more likely to graduate; however, being an English-speaking immigrant (especially one from the Caribbean) is a risk factor. Being enrolled in a school with a high level of non-English speakers is positively associated with graduation.

Language:English
Series:CERIS Working Paper No. 82
Material Type:Report


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