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F.15 HUNGER

Documents

Created Date Wednesday, 12 October 2011
Filesize 1.64 Megabytes

2011 Whos Hungry Report 2011

Title:Who's hungry?: fighting hunger : 2011 profile of fighting hunger in the GTA.
Corporate Author: Daily Bread Food Bank
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Poverty - statistics
Publisher:Daily Bread Food Bank
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2011
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 18 February 2016
Filesize 801 Kilobytes

2007 Hunger Count

 

Title:Hungercount 2007
Corporate Author: Canadian Asociation of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2007
Language:English
Mterial Type:Electronic Resource


Created Date Thursday, 28 January 2016
Filesize 574 Kilobytes

2006 Hunger Count

 

Title:HungerCount 2006
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Food Banks Canada
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2006
Abstract:

HungerCount is a national survey of food bank use in Canada. Initiated in 1989, HungerCount has been conducted on an annual basis since 1997. Each year, we invite every food bank in Canada to participate in order to provide an up-todate national portrait of food bank use and hunger. As the only study of its kind in Canada, HungerCount is a unique measure of assessing hunger in the country. It is important to note that many individuals and families who are food insecure do not use food banks or other charitable food programs. As such, food bank use alone underestimates the extent of the problem nationwide.

Language:English
 
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 28 January 2016
Filesize 346 Kilobytes

2004 Hunger Count 2004

Title:HungerCount 2004: Canada's only annual survey of food banks & emergency food programs.

Variant Title:Poverty in a land of plenty : towards a hunger-free Canada
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2004
Abstract:

HungerCount is a leading barometer of hunger, food insecurity and poverty in Canada.The only annual measure of hunger and food insecurity in Canada, it is a snapshot in time: one month in the life of 517 food banks across Canada.

Language:English
 
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 1.01 Megabytes

2003 Hunger Count 2003

 

Title:HungerCount 2003: Something has to give : food banks filling the policy gap in Canada.
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2003
Abstract:

The Canadian Association of Food Banks’ (CAFB) HungerCount survey is the only annual measure of hunger and food insecurity in Canada. Food banks in every province and territory, from rural and urban areas alike, participate by providing data on the extent of emergency food bank and food program use in their communities. The information they provide captures 75% of emergency food recipients who are relying on more than 639 food banks and 2,648 affiliated agencies across the country to meet the most basic of needs. This vast and diverse network of non-governmental providers shares one common experience above all others: recipients depend on them because they do not have sufficient income to purchase the food they need for themselves and their families. At the same time, food banks are the first to acknowledge that they are not the appropriate vehicle for ensuring that the right to food is realized.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 699 Kilobytes

2002 Hunger Count 2002

 

Title:HungerCount 2002: Eating their words : government failure on food security.
Variant Title:Canada's annual survey of emergency food programs
Author(s):Wilson, Beth|split|Tsoa, Emily
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2002
Abstract:

The HungerCount study is a national survey of food bank use in Canada. Initiated in 1989, the HungerCount study has been conducted on an annual basis since 1997. Each year, we invite every food bank in Canada to participate in order to provide an up-to-date national portrait of hunger and food insecurity. In the past, food bank use was the only measure available for assessing the extent of hunger and food insecurity in Canada. However, recent national population surveys have found that many more individuals than those occupying food bank lines lack the financial resources to access an adequate diet. According to the National Population Health Survey (NPHS) and the National Longitudinal Study of Children and Youth (NLSCY), most food insecure individuals and families do not use food banks or other charitable food programs, despite need. While food bank studies include many marginalized people that are excluded from population studies (due to the use of telephone surveys), food bank use alone underestimates the extent of food insecurity and hunger nationwide. As such, findings from this current study may best be viewed as the tip of the iceberg with respect to hunger and food insecurity in Canada. Within a domestic context, hunger and food insecurity are best understood as consequences of extreme poverty. In this land of plenty, a radically unequal distribution of resources underlies the existence, extent and depth of poverty across the country. Like homelessness, hunger and food insecurity emerge when social policies fail to ensure an adequate standard of living that meets basic needs. The annual HungerCount provides a means of evaluating the progress of governments with respect to ensuring income security, food security and an adequate standard of living for all.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 17 September 2015
Filesize 105 Kilobytes

1998 Hunger Count 1998

Title:HungerCount 1998
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:1998
Abstract:

The main purpose of the HungerCount survey is to determine the number of people assisted by food banks throughout Canada. Therefore, the survey also provides a perspective on hunger in Canada. The survey provides other information as well, including the level and type of assistance rendered by food banks, income sources of the households assisted, and additional information pertaining to the operation of food banks across the country.

Language:English

Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 124 Kilobytes

1997 Hunger Count 1997

Title:HungerCount 1997
Corporate Author: Canadian Association of Food Banks
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Canadian Association of Food Banks
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:1997
Abstract:

The main purpose of the HungerCount survey is to determine the number of people assisted by food banks throughout Canada. Therefore, the survey also provides a perspective on hunger in Canada. The survey provides other information as well, including the level and type of assistance rendered by food banks, income sources of the households assisted, and additional information pertaining to the operation of food banks across the country.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 March 2015
Filesize 203 Kilobytes

1986 March Still Hungry Why

Title:Still hungry: why?
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Citizens for Public Justice , Catholic Social Justice Commission
Subject:Food security - general
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1986
Language:English
Material Type:Fact Sheet

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 2.59 Megabytes

2012 Hunger Count

Title:HungerCount 2012: a comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change.
Corporate Author: Food Banks Canada
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - local food systems|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Food Banks Canada
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

More than three decades after the founding of Canada's first food bank, hundreds of thousands of people need help putting food on their tables each month. We must ask ourselves why this is so. What are the factors that maintain this unacceptable problem? What actions will cut it down to size? HungerCount 2012 offers clear, hard data on food bank use, digs beyond the numbers to explore the root causes of hunger in our country, and provides recommendations to bring about real change. [Taken from report]

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Filesize 4.16 Megabytes

2011 Hunger Count 2011

Title:HungerCount 2011: a comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change.
Corporate Author: Food Banks Canada
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - planning, policy
Publisher:Food Banks Canada
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

In March 2011, 851,014 people were assisted by food banks in Canada. Food bank use is 26% higher than in 2008, and this fact sends a clear message: the effects of the recession are still being felt across the country. As a result, a near record number of people are unable to afford enough food for themselves and their families.

Fifteen months after the end of the 2008-09 recession, food bank use was essentially unchanged from the same period in 2010. Almost half of food banks actually reported an increase in the number of people they assisted in March 2011, compared to the year before.

During the HungerCount survey period, 4,188 organizations participated in collecting information. Their records show that 93,085 people made the difficult decision to ask for help from a food bank for the first time. Requests for help came, in every province and territory, from a wide range of Canadians: people with jobs, on social assistance, and on pensions; single people and families with children; renters, homeowners, and the homeless; those whose families have lived here for generations, and new Canadians.

Food Banks Canada, in partnership with provincial associations, food banks, soup kitchens, and other food programs, has collected data on the need for charitable food assistance annually since 1997. This wealth of information allows us to see that food bank use increases and decreases with the health of the economy – for example, the number of people helped by food banks decreased steadily during the economic boom of the mid-2000s, only to shoot up during the recession, and stay elevated in the current year.

The HungerCount survey also shows that while food bank use moves with the economy, there appears to be a stubborn limit to how low the need for assistance can fall. Food banks have been helping more than 700,000 separate individuals each month for the better part of a decade, through good economic times and bad – a fact of life that the majority of Canadians find unacceptable.

This report provides a snapshot of the problem, and offers constructive recommendations that will improve the economic health of people assisted by food banks and drastically reduce the need for food assistance.

Language:English
Material Type:Report
Frequency:Annual

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Filesize 1.03 Megabytes

2011 Hunger Crisis

 

Title:Hunger crisis: report of the hunger inquiry.
Corporate Author: Recession Relief Coalition
Subject:Food security - general|split|Social issues - economy
Publisher:Recession Relief Coalition
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

This report contains shocking testimony about hunger in Ontario as well as recommendations to help resolve this preventable crisis.
Based on the evidence presented at the Hunger Inquiry, panelists agreed that the principle means by which hunger should be addressed in Ontario should be to raise incomes and made a number of recommendations toward this end. The RRC have responded to the recommendations with a focus on social assistance rates which we believe must be raised immediately in order to stave off a drastic increase in serious health concerns stemming from widespread hunger and malnourishment among the poorest Ontarians.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 941 Kilobytes

2010 Poor Still Pay More

Title:The poor still pay more: challenges low income families face in consuming a nutritious diet.
Author(s):Millway, James|split|Chan, Katherine|split|Stapleton, John|split|Cook, Brian
Subject:Food security - general
Publisher:Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

Though much progress has been made with Ontario’s current Poverty Reduction Strategy, more needs to be done. We currently face an underlying challenge – here in Ontario, many people in poverty are facing hunger today. In 2009, over 375,000 Ontarians had to turn to food banks every month (a growth of 19 percent from last year alone), signaling the alarming effects of the recent recession on the diets and health of our most vulnerable residents. Though food banks have become the public face of our collective response to hunger, it is clear that in spite of their best efforts, food banks and community food initiatives are not a solution to hunger or poverty. Though social assistance has roughly kept pace with inflation since 2004, we are seeing an increasing gap between rising food inflation and social assistance rates, placing greater strain on social assistance recipients and requiring them to allocate a greater portion of their allowance to purchase food. Furthermore, certain food groups, and particularly dairy products have seen a surge in prices, making basic nutrition more expensive for low income families. Specifically, Canada’s milk prices are highest among its international peers as a result of our supply management system, where restrictive quotas have led to artificially inflated prices at the expense of its consumers. There is also a growing concern that basic access to food remains a challenge as “food deserts,” or low income neighbourhoods with limited access to food retailers providing healthy foods and fresh produce, exist in Toronto today. The report recommends: A new housing benefit geared to income and rental costs to free up constrained finances to purchase food Improved incentives for retailers and community groups to increase accessibility by low income communities to lower priced and healthier food options, particularly in urban “food deserts” The eventual elimination of the price influence of dairy marketing boards

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 1.98 Megabytes

2010 Hunger Count 2010

Title:HungerCount 2010: a comprehensive report on hunger and food bank use in Canada, and recommendations for change.
Corporate Author: Food Banks Canada
Subject:Food security - hunger, health|split|Food security - statistics, studies
Publisher:Food Banks Canada
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

Over the last two years, food bank use in Canada has risen by 28% – an unprecedented rate of growth. After four consecutive years of decline, demand for food banks has skyrocketed since the 2008-09 recession. This year, every province experienced an increase in the number of individuals requiring help, and nearly three-quarters of all Canadian food banks helped more people than in 2009. HungerCount shows that the effects of the recession are still being felt across the country. In March of this year, 80,150 people accessed a food bank for the first time – approximately the same level as twelve months earlier. March is a typical month for food bank usage, which means that more than 80,000 people walk through the door of a food bank for the first time every single month. The need for food assistance increased almost across the spectrum this year: food banks saw more adults, children, and youth; more families with children and more single people; more women and men; more Aboriginal people; more seniors; more people with disabilities. The picture of those who access food banks has remained remarkably consistent over the years, and 2010 is no different: 38% are children or youth under age 18; 51% of assisted households are families with children, and nearly half of these are two-parent families. A large percentage of those needing support (40%) are single-person households, many of them counting social assistance as their primary source of income. Though fewer people with jobs accessed food banks this year, households with income from current or recent employment are, at 17% of the total, still a significant proportion of those helped.

Language:English
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 24 August 2010
Filesize 563 Kilobytes

2010 Food Security Edmonton

Title:Food security for Edmonton: is it really something we should care about?
Author(s):Lipton, Becky
Subject:Food security - general
Publisher:Becky Lipton Research & Consulting
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

Could we ever achieve complete food security – where every Edmontonian has enough healthy and safe food to eat, which we can supply in a sustainable manner, no matter what? This paper explores what achieving food security would mean, what factors would influence our ability, and our decisions to do so, what is really at stake, and what the ultimate benefits would be. The paper delves into some of the big picture factors like peak oil, climate change, food miles, and other international influences we have limited to no control over. It also looks at what makes Edmonton unique when it comes to food security. Things like how much food we export, the price of food, hunger in the city, our high quality soils, our micro-climates and our farmers all influence whether and how we should be thinking about food security. Finally a strategy is presented which builds on our strengths and proactively moves us towards a healthy, resilient and sustainable future.

Language:English
Series:The Edmonton Sustainability Papers - Discussion Paper 7
 Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 21 July 2010
Filesize 1.85 Megabytes

2010 Every Bite Counts

Title:Every bite counts: climate justice and BC's food system.
Author(s):Lee, Marc|split|Barbolet, Herb|split|Adams, Tegan|split|Thomson, Matt
Corporate Author: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, BC office
Subject:Food security - local food systems|split|Environmental issues - climate change
Publisher:Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, BC office
Place of Publication:Vancouver
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

The abundance of the modern supermarket is the ultimate product of a post-WWII food system based on industrial-scale agriculture, cheap fossil fuels and global trade. Examining our food through a climate change lens, however, suggests a rethink is in order — from reducing the greenhouse gases produced throughout the food system, to making the food system resilient to supply disruptions. BC also needs to develop a more just distribution of food, better support farmers, farmworkers and fishers, and seek healthier nutritional outcomes from our food system. This is not a task that can be left to market forces alone. It calls for a more coherent planning framework at all levels of the food system. The supermarket cannot ensure food security, which according to the Community Nutritionists Council of BC, “exists when all community residents obtain a safe, personally acceptable, nutritious diet through a sustainable food system that maximizes healthy choices, community self-reliance and equal access for everyone.” Such a systems approach to food is becoming widespread in BC and other jurisdictions. BC is starting in an excellent position to move forward, with most domestic food production occurring on small farms, while ties to local markets have been strengthening through initiatives like weekly farmers’ markets, community shared agriculture projects, and home delivery services. BC also has the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), although its erosion in recent years is cause for concern. These ingredients point towards a food system that could be, with strong public policy actions, just and sustainable.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

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